Posts Tagged ‘Kent Pipes’

Kent Pipes/Winzinger plot exposed

Tuesday, August 13th, 2013

Salt & Light (Kent Pipes) and Mill Race Village (Winzinger) jointly filed an application to NJ for MILLIONS of your tax dollars to buy more properties.

The best part of this is they sabotaged an application last year in which the developer wanted to spent millions of his own money to develop the same area. Now they want to use millions of our tax dollars to do the same thing they both said was “bad for that area”. Just what this town needs, more Salt and Light properties. SMH

Inquirer Story

Over bowls of creamy clam chowder at her sister’s restaurant, the Robin’s Nest, Audrey Winzinger sits across from Kent Pipes as the two ponder their next move in Mount Holly neighborhood-building. Whatever they come up with for moving Mill Race Village past its present frontiers, it is bound to generate controversy. “Some people don’t like me,” said Pipes, a former Presbyterian minister and a veteran developer of affordable housing, “and some people don’t like Audrey. “And others don’t like either of us,” said Pipes, drawing a laugh from Winzinger, whose family has spent 25 years assembling a portfolio of historic buildings at the edge of downtown as living/work space. Together, the Winzingers, operating as Mill Race Inc., and Pipes, as the Affordable Home Group Inc., own 32 properties in the township’s oldest neighborhood, the quaint, artsy retail area of Mill Race Village. Winzinger calls some of her 25 properties “placeholders” – acquired when they became available through sale or foreclosure but outside the village’s current boundaries. Pipes’ seven are those he rehabbed as housing for low- and moderate-income tenants. Now, the two are talking about the 65,000-square-foot, five-building complex for sale between Church and Monroe Streets. Last year, Mount Holly rejected a proposal to turn the buildings, one of them the 19th-century T.H. Risdon & Son mill that produced turbine water wheels, into affordable housing for 75 seniors. The Winzingers, the Mill Race business owners, and even Pipes, whose name is synonymous with affordable housing, opposed the plan. “Mount Holly has enough affordable housing for its size,” he said. “We need housing for people who will spend money in shops and restaurants, who will create a wave that will rejuvenate the rest of town.” Pipes’ idea is to tap into the new New Jersey Neighborhood Revitalization Tax Credit program to help finance the gradual transformation of the five-building property into a mix of high-density housing on top and commercial enterprises on the ground floors. The renovation of the historic parts of the mill might be eligible for federal tax credits as well. “The state wants to rebuild communities like this,” Pipes said, “and this one is a slam-dunk if they can be made to understand what has happened already here. “The neighborhood is surrounded by county facilities, a major hospital, and historic buildings. Think of what it could be in five to 10 years.” Winzinger cautions, however, that change does not come overnight and is not always welcome. “Acquiring 25 buildings has been a long process, a toothless grin slowly filling in to a smile,” said Winzinger, seated in her sister’s restaurant at Washington and White Streets. The efforts have been helped by changes in zoning for Mill Race Village that eliminated the need for municipal action each time a building there is acquired and rehabbed as living/work property. When her sister, Robin, finished culinary school in Philadelphia and wanted to open a restaurant, their mother, Joanne, agreed to finance the venture if it was in Mount Holly. “My mother likes to buy land on the water,” Audrey said, and the long-vacant former appliance store, where her parents met, was in front of the mill race. In a county seat, the breakfast and lunch business is a winner, but when Robin tried dinner, things hit a wall, she said. “There needed to be other reasons for people to be here at night, and we thought an artists’ village might do it,” Audrey said. That’s when the Winzingers started buying houses and creating apartments on top and shops on the first floor. The market-rate rents for the apartments help subsidize those of the shopkeepers and artists, who usually start on shoestring budgets, Audrey Winzinger said. Right now, there are 17 shops. The Winzingers and current shopkeepers vet each newcomer, who must follow the village’s opening days and hours and join a committee or board in the township “to fully participate in the life of Mount Holly.” “There is little turnover,” Winzinger said, “just owners moving to larger spaces as their businesses grow.” “I was the Winzingers’ [horse] farm manager when they came to me 22 years ago about starting a business,” said Pat Johnson of Teddies of Mount Holly, on White Street. The buyers of her teddy bears come, either in person or online, from all over the world, Johnson said. Thelma Harper of Earth Angel, which sells primitives and handmade gifts, has been here 17 years. “I was the second one here,” said Harper, who had been in four other marketplaces before. “It is a pleasant place to work, and the whole atmosphere of the village is inviting.” Susan Thomas of Silver Linings, who lives over her shop, was in Rancocas Woods before coming to Mill Race 16 years ago. “The Winzingers were customers,” she said, adding that success of the community is “working with just one landlord.” Rich Carty of Pineland Folk Music & Basketry, which sells Appalachian and hammered dulcimers, Native American flutes and other folk music instruments and baskets, moved to Mill Race in 2004. “My wife, son and I talked about coming here, and after a while, we all became receptive to the idea,” he said. “I live about a half-mile from here, and I can bicycle or walk easily,” said Carty, adding that “being here has made me care more about this town.”
Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/business/20130811_Debating_the_future_of_Mt__Holly_s_Mill_Race_Village.html#fefkUY6I26UyrGA7.99
Over bowls of creamy clam chowder at her sister’s restaurant, the Robin’s Nest, Audrey Winzinger sits across from Kent Pipes as the two ponder their next move in Mount Holly neighborhood-building. Whatever they come up with for moving Mill Race Village past its present frontiers, it is bound to generate controversy. “Some people don’t like me,” said Pipes, a former Presbyterian minister and a veteran developer of affordable housing, “and some people don’t like Audrey. “And others don’t like either of us,” said Pipes, drawing a laugh from Winzinger, whose family has spent 25 years assembling a portfolio of historic buildings at the edge of downtown as living/work space. Together, the Winzingers, operating as Mill Race Inc., and Pipes, as the Affordable Home Group Inc., own 32 properties in the township’s oldest neighborhood, the quaint, artsy retail area of Mill Race Village. Winzinger calls some of her 25 properties “placeholders” – acquired when they became available through sale or foreclosure but outside the village’s current boundaries. Pipes’ seven are those he rehabbed as housing for low- and moderate-income tenants. Now, the two are talking about the 65,000-square-foot, five-building complex for sale between Church and Monroe Streets. Last year, Mount Holly rejected a proposal to turn the buildings, one of them the 19th-century T.H. Risdon & Son mill that produced turbine water wheels, into affordable housing for 75 seniors. The Winzingers, the Mill Race business owners, and even Pipes, whose name is synonymous with affordable housing, opposed the plan. “Mount Holly has enough affordable housing for its size,” he said. “We need housing for people who will spend money in shops and restaurants, who will create a wave that will rejuvenate the rest of town.” Pipes’ idea is to tap into the new New Jersey Neighborhood Revitalization Tax Credit program to help finance the gradual transformation of the five-building property into a mix of high-density housing on top and commercial enterprises on the ground floors. The renovation of the historic parts of the mill might be eligible for federal tax credits as well. “The state wants to rebuild communities like this,” Pipes said, “and this one is a slam-dunk if they can be made to understand what has happened already here. “The neighborhood is surrounded by county facilities, a major hospital, and historic buildings. Think of what it could be in five to 10 years.” Winzinger cautions, however, that change does not come overnight and is not always welcome. “Acquiring 25 buildings has been a long process, a toothless grin slowly filling in to a smile,” said Winzinger, seated in her sister’s restaurant at Washington and White Streets. The efforts have been helped by changes in zoning for Mill Race Village that eliminated the need for municipal action each time a building there is acquired and rehabbed as living/work property. When her sister, Robin, finished culinary school in Philadelphia and wanted to open a restaurant, their mother, Joanne, agreed to finance the venture if it was in Mount Holly. “My mother likes to buy land on the water,” Audrey said, and the long-vacant former appliance store, where her parents met, was in front of the mill race. In a county seat, the breakfast and lunch business is a winner, but when Robin tried dinner, things hit a wall, she said. “There needed to be other reasons for people to be here at night, and we thought an artists’ village might do it,” Audrey said. That’s when the Winzingers started buying houses and creating apartments on top and shops on the first floor. The market-rate rents for the apartments help subsidize those of the shopkeepers and artists, who usually start on shoestring budgets, Audrey Winzinger said. Right now, there are 17 shops. The Winzingers and current shopkeepers vet each newcomer, who must follow the village’s opening days and hours and join a committee or board in the township “to fully participate in the life of Mount Holly.” “There is little turnover,” Winzinger said, “just owners moving to larger spaces as their businesses grow.” “I was the Winzingers’ [horse] farm manager when they came to me 22 years ago about starting a business,” said Pat Johnson of Teddies of Mount Holly, on White Street. The buyers of her teddy bears come, either in person or online, from all over the world, Johnson said. Thelma Harper of Earth Angel, which sells primitives and handmade gifts, has been here 17 years. “I was the second one here,” said Harper, who had been in four other marketplaces before. “It is a pleasant place to work, and the whole atmosphere of the village is inviting.” Susan Thomas of Silver Linings, who lives over her shop, was in Rancocas Woods before coming to Mill Race 16 years ago. “The Winzingers were customers,” she said, adding that success of the community is “working with just one landlord.” Rich Carty of Pineland Folk Music & Basketry, which sells Appalachian and hammered dulcimers, Native American flutes and other folk music instruments and baskets, moved to Mill Race in 2004. “My wife, son and I talked about coming here, and after a while, we all became receptive to the idea,” he said. “I live about a half-mile from here, and I can bicycle or walk easily,” said Carty, adding that “being here has made me care more about this town.”
Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/business/20130811_Debating_the_future_of_Mt__Holly_s_Mill_Race_Village.html#fefkUY6I26UyrGA7.99

Letter from Mayor Donnelly

Friday, October 26th, 2012

No approval needed for half-way houses in Mt. Holly from the Planning Board as long as the Mayor approves

Read the letter from Mayor Donnelly

Runyan to visit Garden St. half-way house

Tuesday, October 23rd, 2012

Will present ceremonial check to Kent Pipes

email from Pipes:

From: Kent Pipes <kentrpipes@aol.com>
Date: October 23, 2012, 3:10:36 PM EDT
To: Ryan Donnelly <rdonnelly@mountholly.info>, <drose@mountholly.info>,<tgibson@mountholly.info>,  dbelton@mountholly.info,
Subject: 209-211 Garden St.

Cong. Jon Runyan, [R] 3rd Cong. District is going to be visiting the property at 209-211 Garden St. on Tuesday, October 30th at 12:30 to meet the representatives from the Federal Home Loan Bank of New York who will present us with the ceremonial check from their award of $200,000 toward the purchase and renovation of the Amity Transitional Housing project that was announced last week.

I want to invite you to be present to share with us in this joyous event and to welcome the Congressman and the FHLB representatives to Mt. Holly.
We still have not had confirmation on any funding being awarded by the NJ Dept. of Community Affairs Shelter Support Program that we applied for this summer.  So, the funding package is not complete, but this is a major first step in putting the project together with the funding needed to complete goal of creating 10 more units of transitional housing for women and children.
Kent R. Pipes, President
The Affordable Homes Group, Inc.
PO Box 249 (1060 Monmouth Rd.)
Eastampton (Mt. Holly), NJ 08060
Follow on Twitter @kentrpipes

Mt. Holly in national media spotlight again

Wednesday, August 22nd, 2012

Epic failure of the Gardens redevelopment project

The failed redevelopment of the Mt. Holly Gardens continues to not only waste our tax dollars but attract unwanted attention from the media. This time the issue was featured in a Huffington Post story.

The hypocrite Kent Pipes is quoted in the story but what they left out is he personally profited from the Gardens project.

Almost $20 MILLION in debt and no shovel in the ground yet in May 2010 they had a “ceremonial ground-breaking” for election year politics. What will they do this year, celebrate that they are building a high-density apartment complex that is going to over-crowd our schools?

Kent Pipes continues to ruin Mt. Holly

Tuesday, January 10th, 2012

Homeless shelter approved on Garden Street

BCT Story

A Garden Street property can now house a total of 25 homeless women and children.

A certificate of occupancy was granted by the township late last month to the Affordable Homes Group Inc. of Eastampton for the property at 209-211 Garden St.

Kent Pipes, president of the nonprofit, said residents are expected to move into the transitional housing in the next few weeks. (more…)

2011 in review

Monday, January 2nd, 2012

School and Fire District budgets rubber stamped, new Councilman elected, Council refuses to pass ethics policy (twice), and police force cut while crime on the rise.

Budgets

The year 2011 brought a couple surprises but a lot of business as usual. In February the Fire District budget was defeated by the public just to have Town Council rubber stamp it and keep the tax increase intact. The same thing happened in April with the School District budget when that was defeated by the voters as well. Councilman Dow seemed to be the only member of Council listening to the will of the voters as he voted no for both defeated budgets. Also in April on the school ballot was a public question for the township to exceed the 2% tax cap. The question was narrowly defeated in contrast to the school budgets that were defeated by significant margins. As a result of the defeated cap question the MHPD staffing was cut and two police officers now patrol our town per shift instead of three. At the same time violent crime has been on the rise and at least four shootings occurred in town.

Elections (more…)

Hollowell, Belton, Gibson = sore losers

Monday, November 14th, 2011

At the council meeting Monday night Hollowell showed what a sore loser he is by crying about how he should have won the election and that its not fair that he lost.

Belton and Gibson cheered him on.

Note: Hollowell sat next to Kent Pipes at the meeting. Pipes has pledged thousands for Hollowell’s next attempt at office. Owning over twenty properties in town (and pays ZERO in taxes) Pipes has a lot at stake.

Kent Pipes supports Hollowell

Saturday, November 5th, 2011

The man who wants to put half-way houses everywhere in Mt. Holly supports Hollowell

Approximately four Salt and Light (Pipes) owned properties in town are proudly displaying Hollowell signs. Even the Salt and Light admin building in Eastampton has a Hollowell campaign sign in front of it. Pipes who was in attendance at the Candidates Night publicly endorsed Hollowell and even bragged that he contributed to his campaign. Pipes owns 20+ properties in Mt. Holly through his varies companies and pays ZERO in taxes so I guess he is trying to protect his investment.

Hollowell’s supporters:

Kent Pipes- who stands to make a lot of money off his gardens properties and wants to put half-way houses in town

High Street Elite- the political machine that controls town and wastes your tax dollars

Winnzinger Inc- has made millions of dollars from demolishing homes in the Gardens and used millions of your tax dollars on their businesses in town

Pipes properties are listed below, drive by and see for yourself:

87 Mill St.

94-96 Rancocas Rd.

113 Rancocas Rd.

121 Rancocas Rd.

several properties on Grant St.